Off the beaten track there’s a land of mud, hills and fun. Of course, you can’t just take any vehicle on these adventures. These are paths for the mighty, for the prepared, for something…. a little different.

What is Green Laning?

Green Laning is a term used to describe the often overgrown and slightly more obscure pathways to your destination. They are treated just the same as your standard A and B roads and essentially follow some of the same laws. Obviously you’re not going to use a winch to pull yourself along a normal road, so there are some differences.

The term “Green Laning” isn’t officially the correct term, but it’s a term that’s been adopted by insurers and enthusiasts alike. The official term would be “byways open to all traffic” (BOAT) however, this may come across as a bit misleading. When they say “all traffic”, what they mean is a vehicle that’s suited to the rugged terrain, so your typical vehicle just wouldn’t survive or even manage to get passed the first obstacle.

Typically, the vehicles used for Green Laning would be your Land Rovers, Range rovers, Jeeps and even ex-military vehicles. Basically, any big 4×4 vehicles that can be lifted high off to the ground for better clearance on hills.

Insurance for Green Laning

As standard, even some of these vehicles need a helping hand and so more often than not, modifications are made. We insure a huge range of modified vehicles at Brentacre, but it’s usually a case of “I’ve lowered my car” or “I’ve had it remapped so it’s a lot quicker”.

Now we’re looking at modifications like adding a snorkel, lifting the vehicle for better clearance, bigger wheels, wider tyres. For further information, we advise that you visit our 4×4 car insurance page.

What’s Involved

With Green Laning terrain, speed isn’t the aim of the game, the fun is in the mud and water, the hill climbs and towing your mates out of tough spots. Just remember not to go dressed in your best. You will get muddy and you will get knocked around along with your 4×4.

If you’re old school or if you’re going so far into the wilderness that there’s no GPS signal, to find Green lanes on Ordnance Survey maps look out for a line of plus marks, like this +++++.

For a full list of symbols, check here on the Ordnance Survey website where you’ll be able to tell your Green Lanes (down as Byway open to all traffic) from your footpaths and many other useful symbols.

It’s important to bear in mind though that whilst your having fun and seeing parts of the UK reserved for the adventurous, if you don’t use the lanes with a bit of consideration for others users, restrictions can and will be implemented, ruining the fun for everyone else. Nobody wants that.

There are, as with any other type of vehicle or hobby, clubs and events throughout the UK. Gatherings of mud loving, like minded people looking to see who’s vehicle can get across the toughest terrain and withstand the ups and downs that come with Green Lane driving.

With miles and miles and green lanes to explore up and down the country, you’ll want to make sure you pick the best paths. The best place to check would be GLASS, the Green Lane Association. With representatives across the UK, you’ll always be able to find an experienced and enthusiast guide to take you to the best spots.

Green Laning isn’t for everyone, but it should be experienced if just to see something new, go somewhere you haven’t been before and see what all the fuss is about. The hills are alive with the sound of 4x4s!